Nigerian consul general in South Africa, Ambassador Uche Ajulu-Okeke said Nigeria can assist South African with tips on how to be tolerance with foreigners . Ajulu-Okeke said this during a recent discussion on xenophobia in Africa.    

According to her, “Nigeria is the one country in Africa where you will not be asked for your papers. We issued 900 visas a month for South Africans to visit Nigeria. We must be able to tolerate each other.”

The consular said that there was a protocol of free movement between countries in West Africa.

“When you drop into that melting pot, nobody wants to know who you are or where you’re from,” she said.

In South Africa, however, because of apartheid, “you are still segmented”, she said. “You need vibrancy.”

She further explained that the xenophobic practiced by South Africans can spell doom for the country.

“As the second-leading economy on the continent, the increasing emergence of xenophobia as social policy and practice in the face of presumed state acquiescence will only lead South Africa backwards and demotivate its continental integration and development.”

“South Africa’s history of apartheid meant that people faced institutionalized exclusion, so “xenophobia has become an unanticipated consequence of national development efforts”.

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South Africans could learn a thing or two from Nigeria about tolerance and treating foreigners well, says Nigerian consul general Uche Ajulu-Okeke.

In fact, her consulate is busy establishing a cultural centre where South African wives can learn to say “I love you” to their Nigerian spouses in that country’s many languages.

During a discussion about xenophobia on Tuesday night, the consul general, who is based in Johannesburg, said: “Nigeria is the one country in Africa where you will not be asked for your papers.”

Her office, she said during the talk at Wits University, issued 900 visas a month for South Africans to visit Nigeria.

“We must be able to tolerate each other,” she said.

Ajulu-Okeke said there was a protocol of free movement between countries in west Africa.

“When you drop into that melting pot, nobody wants to know who you are or where you’re from,” she said.

In South Africa, however, because of apartheid, “you are still segmented”, she said. “You need vibrancy.”

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On Thursday 11th of December 2014 the Nigerian Voice Newspaper put together the first ever Nigerian community Christmas Carol Evening. The event took place at the Church Auditorium of Glory Christian Centre in Pretoria.

The Consul-General Her Excellency Ambassador Uche Ajulu-Okeke attended the well-organized event as the Special Guest of Honour. Addressing the audience, she stated that “I am very proud of the organizers of this event, it is a well-organized and entertaining event, and we I will continue to support such wonderful initiatives that will make Nigerians proud of their identity” .She concluded “I am delighted I attended this event and that I came with my family and also with a Director from the Presidency as it afforded me the opportunity to interact with Nigerians and friends of our dear country outside official duties”.

Performing at the Community Christmas Carol Evening were Tshwane Gospel Choir, Gloryland Voice, The Favored Band (Nigerian Students University of Pretoria band), Godisang, Ola Sax and Oluomo.

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